JEANS  GENES

                         Publication of the Rockdale County Genealogical Society

                                                                             August,  2007


                      August 12, 2007, Meeting

The Rockdale County Genealogical Society will meet on Sunday, August
12, 2007, at 3:00 p.m., at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day
Saints, 1275 Flat Shoals Road, S. E., Conyers, GA.

The program for this meeting will be a Share Day. Come and learn about
the families your fellow members are researching.

Visitors are welcome and encouraged to attend. There are no monthly
dues, but donations are accepted and appreciated. For information
call 770-922-5680 or e-mail claudin1@bellsouth.net.


                   Library Visitors List Names Researched

Dorothy C. Keilen, Benton, AR. No names given.
Sandria Perritt, No names or address given.
Bailey Perritt, No names or address given
Gordon Hart, No names or address given.
Donald Pence, Conyers, Ga. No names given.
Nathan & Kaydle Mathews, P O Box 1975, Fayetteville, Ga. Researching Travis.
Kim Y. Conyers, P. O. Box EE15574, Nassau, The Bahamas, (242) 326-4735.
Reserching Conyers Family History.



                  Programs Planned for the Rest of the Year

September -- John Brown is scheduled to present a program on “Restoring
Family Photos with Computer Graphics Programs”

October -- Judge Lillis Brown will speak on “WILLS”.

November -- Our annual Birthday/Anniversary Celebration

December -- No meeting

January 2008 -- Janet Skelton, Regent of the
Col. John McIntosh Chapter, will do a program on the DAR.



               Special Collection Books Reorganized

The Nancy Quinn Library staff has been restructuring the arrangement
of books in the special collections room. You may find it easier to
located the books which you need to review. The books are now shelved
according to geographical location. Everything regarding Rockdale,
for instance, is on the shelves together. Likewise, if you need Newton
County records, you will find the books shelved together.

This may require some study, if you are accustomed to the way the
books were originally shelved. The new arrangement should make it
easier for novices or out-of-town visitors to use the books more efficiently.
The old hands may find it initially somewhat difficult to locate the
books which were used frequently. No one ever said that progress was
going to be easy.


               Family Search Web Site Noted

Family Search is the LDS Church website. Much of the information formerly
provided by microfiche and CD-Rom is now available on-line at www.
familysearch.org.  Click Here

Twenty-five million names are organized by families and pedigrees
called the Ancestral File. The IGI, or International Genealogical
Index is a database of deceased individuals from many sources. A family
History Library Catalog lists two million microfilms and hundreds
of thousands of books.

Searches can be made of the files. Each file allows you to customize
your search. A custom search of the Ancestral File will get you a
list of matching names. Clicking on the name will retrieve the individual
record. Clicking on the pedigree button will retrieve a four-generation
pedigree chart. Subsequent pedigree buttons will retrieve further
pages of the pedigree chart.

Some of the search options require registration.
This requests you to submit a GEDCOM of your research for inclusion;
or, requests that you list your website (if you have one) to the Family-Search
Internet Search list.

This is a vast all-inclusive web site. If you don’t find it here,
you probably won’t find it on-line.



         A Letter to My Friend Beginning His Research

Dear Jeff,

It was surprising to learn that you have become interested in researching
your ancestors. Welcome to the club. Genealogy is certainly one of
the most engrossing and rewarding hobbies that you could find. It
is also becoming one of the most popular. Millions of people worldwide
pursue this hobby. This fact has not been lost on those who would
use this to further their own aims. For this reason, I regard the
new on-line services somewhat disdainfully. Yes, you can do a lot
of research on-line. You will also find that there is a lot of misinformation.
Then again, many people have become reluctant to allow their hard-earned
research to become part of the copying, and reposting of information
which is prevalent today.

The fact is, there is no way that the on-line information can possibly
provide much of the essential information which is necessary to confirm
and prove the family lines that are so carelessly posted on many of
the services. Nothing takes the place of viewing the original documents
yourself. Nothing beats the thrill of finding the document with the
signature of your ancestor. Also, many sources of information will
never be posted on-line because the information is contained in copyrighted
books. You have to go the the libraries to find the books with this
information.

I doubt very seriously that the on-line services will ever be much
more than a place to start. You can start very easily at any good
library which has copies of the microfilmed census. All libraries
don’t have every census location. Here is where the on-line services
have the advantage. If you need to find a census for another state,
you probably can locate it on-line. Never be let said that I said
that on-line services should not be used. On-the-contrary, the interaction
of individuals by email and web sites often brings together people
who share a common ancestor and allows them to exchange information
which would otherwise not be located.

Allow me to congratulate you on your new-found hobby. Since you would
like to do your research by computer, I offer these web sites for
your use:

www.familysearch.org
www.cyndislist.com 
www.usgenweb.com
www.genforum.com
www.rootsweb.com
www.ancestry.com 
www.genealogy.com

Also, you might want to read the information on the Family Search
Web Site mentioned in an article in the August "Jeans and Genes" newsletter
at:
http://mtf.home.mindspring.com/newsltr.htm


            Cenotaphs Explained


A cenotaph is an empty grave. Three major types of cenotaphs can be
found.

1. A cenotaph memorializing a person whose body was lost or was buried
at sea, i.e., Amelia Earhart, Oliver Cromwell.

2. A cenotaph memorializing a person who was originally buried at
that location but later the body was moved to a different location,
i.e., John Quincy Adams, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

3. A cenotaph simply memorializing a person of note as a gesture of
respect and honor (many occurrences of this can be found at Westminster
Abbey in London), i.e., Lord Byron, T. S. Eliot, Lewis Carroll.



       A Method of Taking Care of Your Genealogical  Records

A Genealogical Will  “Genealogical Codicil to My Last Will and Testament:"

To my spouse, children, guardian, administrator and/or executor:

Upon my demise it is requested that you DO NOT dispose of any or all
of my genealogical records, both those prepared personally by me and
those records prepared by others which may be in my possession, including
but not limited to books, files, notebooks or computer programs for
a period of two years. During this time period, please attempt to
identify one or more persons who would be willing to take custody
of the said materials and the responsibility of maintaining and continuing
the family histories. [If you know who within your family or friends
is a likely candidate to accept these materials, please add the following
at this point: “I suggest that the persons contacted regarding the
assumption of the custody of these items include but not be limited
to” and then list the names of those individuals at this point, with
their addresses and telephone numbers if known]

 In the event you do not find anyone to accept these materials, please
contact the various genealogical organizations that I have been a
member of and determine if they will accept some parts or all of my
genealogical materials. [List of organizations, addresses and phone
numbers at bottom; include local chapters, with their addresses, phone
numbers and contact persons if available as well as state- national
contact information and addresses].

Please remember that my genealogical endeavors consumed a great deal
of time, travel, and money. Therefore, it is my desire that the products
of these endeavors be allowed to continue in a manner that will make
them available to others in the future.
Signature  Date
Witness    Date
Witness    Date
 


       Lithonia-Davidson Library Celebrates 100 Years

The Lithonia-Davidson Library recently celebrated its 100th anniversary.
It was established by Ms. Lula Almond on June 30th, 1907, in her home.
She donated fifty books. The library was moved from her home to a
building on Main Street in Lithonia and later to a room in the Lithonia
Women’s Club.

The library was renamed the Lithonia-Davidson Library in 1992 to honor
Mrs. Charles Davidson, chairperson from 1940 to 1971. This library
preceded the Nancy Quinn Library by ten years.

The library has little if any genealogical materials. Dekalb County
houses most of such materials at the Dekalb Historical Society which
is located in the old Court House Building on the square in Decatur.
Another great genealogical library in Decatur is the Decatur City
Library which has excellent materials and great microfilm readers.
Either of these two libraries would be a good place to do research.



            Keeping Up With Web Sites

Keeping Up with New Web Sites for Genealogy & FH Webmaster - Webmasters:
Domain Names Registration.

Keeping Up with New Web Sites can currently be done online at What’s
New in Genealogy & Family History Resources.
http://www.academic-genealogy.com/whatsnewingenealogyfamilyhistory.htm

What’s New in Family History, Genealogy & Local History Books.
http://www.academic-genealogy.com/whatsnewbooks.htm
shows samples of new book publications forthcoming to A.D. 2010.

Currently, it is fashionable to check two particular sites for genealogy
submissions to the Internet; namely: What’s New on Cyndi’s List? What’s
Really New in WWW Genealogy Pages.
Various other organizations have disparate collaboration lists, or
specialized membership connected groupings.

Family Genealogy & History Internet Education Directory, a scholarly
mega site map of World Wide Internet Resources, lists another methodology
at Domain Names: http://www.academic-genealogy.com/genealogywebmasters.htm#domain

In particular, the Domain Directory Wiki - AboutUs is “a website about
websites that you can edit”. It includes “Family History” and “Genealogy”
searches, and has currently listed, approximately 4,957 indexed domain
names in the Category:Genealogy sections, http://www.aboutus.org/Category:Genealogy
http://www.aboutus.org/category:genealogy

as well as related Categories. ” AboutUs is a wiki whose goal is to
create a free and valuable Internet resource containing information
both about websites and other related data. The site was pre-populated
with information about many different websites and thousands of updates
are now being made by people each day.” http://www.aboutus.org/AboutUs
http://www.aboutus.org/aboutus

. . . “Having a great AboutUs page will help expose your site to people
surfing the internet and major search engines, making it easier for
people browsing the web to find you. In addition to maximizing exposure,
AboutUs itself can also be another source of additional traffic.”
http://www.aboutus.org/Welcome http://www.aboutus.org/welcome

Respectfully yours,
Tom Tinney, Sr. Who’s Who in America, Millennium Edition [54th] through
2004 Who’s Who In Genealogy and Heraldry, [both editions] Family Genealogy
& History Internet Education Directory http://www.academic-genealogy.com/
“V. Chris and Tom Tinney, Sr.” <vctinney@sbcglobal.net>


        Accessing Web Sites Shown on the Newsletter

Web sites shown on this newsletter can be accessed more easily by

going to the web site maintained by your editor.  Generally, links

are provided on the on-line version of the newsletter which can be

accessed by one click of your mouse.  However, some sites may not

be current.  It is not possible to verify in each instance that each

site is being maintained.  Go to:  http://mtf.home.mindspring.com/newsltr.htm



   

JEANS & GENES is a publication of the Rockdale County Genealogical
Society.
% Nancy Guinn Library
864 Green St. SW
Conyers, Ga.  30012

President:  Norman Swann
V. President:  Bill Freese
Treasurer: Ellen Trainer
Secretary: Jane Conn
Program Chairman:  Claudine Jackson:
Membership Chairman:   Jenel Ship
Trip Coordinator:  Ann Walker
Board Member:  Bertha Little
Newsletter: Marion T. Farmer
                   1500 A. Pine Log Rd NE
                    Conyers, GA. 30012
mtf@mindspring.com
http://mtf.home.mindspring.com